Mortal Storm 1942The Mortal Storm (Bufera Mortale) – USA 1940

Directed by: Frank Borzage.

Starring: Margaret Sullavan; James Stewart; Frank Morgan; Robert Young; Robert Stack.

In the service of that Country there were no human relationships…

January 30, 1933 – In a small University Town in Germany, not far from the Austrian border, the “non-Arian” Professor Victor Roth, who lives in comfort and honour loved by his students and family – his wife, Arian stepsons Otto and Erich, his daughter Freya and the younger son Rudi – celebrates his 60th anniversary. After a moving ceremony at the Medicine faculty where he works, the Professor finally enjoys an evening with his family and friends, the right occasion to announce Freya’s engagement with Fritz. But suddenly the maid arrives all excited whit a news just heard at the radio: Adolf Hitler is the new German Chancellor…

The Mortal Storm (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

This way begins The Mortal Storm, the 1940 drama directed by Frank Borzage and starring Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart, Robert Young and Frank Morgan and guess what? From that point on everything goes wrong. It came out that Fritz (Robert Young) is nothing but a Nazi party enthusiast member, just like Otto (Robert Stack) and Erich. Freya (Margaret Sullavan) understands she has made a mistake preferring him to Martin (James Stewart), the loyal non-Nazi friend, and Professor Roth (Frank Morgan) foresees future troubles that soon arrive. Martin defends a “non-Arian” teacher hit by Nazis, helps him to leave Germany and has to flee the Country himself and go to Austria. Freya resolves to leave Fritz and the “non-Arian” Professor Roth is accused to sabotage the new Nazi Germany teaching a scientific fact: there’s no difference between Arian and “non-Arian” blood. At first he’s sacked, then he’s imprisoned in a concentration camp where he soon dies. Trying to move to Austria whit her mother and young Rudi, Freya is caught by border officers with the draft of her father’s last book in her suitcase. She can do nothing but go back home where she unexpectedly finds Martin who, at the risk of his life, came back only to save hers. They confess each other their mutual love and after a touching informal wedding ceremony celebrated by Martin’s mother (Maria Ouspenskaya), they try to escape through a mountain pass and to cross the border skying. But at the Nazi’s headquarter everybody knows what is going to happen and Fritz is chosen to catch them….

I spare you the very ending, anyway after such an exhaustive synopsis you’ve surely understood that this is an anti-Nazi propaganda film, but why should you watch it today apart from its A-list cast?

Margaret Sullavan(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Mortal Storm, released on June 14 1940 exactly 9 months and a half after the Nazi invasion of Poland, was judged relevant but a bit dated by some film critic and yet this film, based on the 1938 novel with the same title written by the British writer Phyllis Bottome, explicitly citing Hitler’s name, Nazi Germany, beatings-up, intimidation, discrimination and even concentration camps (though depicted in a far too optimistic way despite Professor Roth’s death), but forgetting to cite explicitly Jews and calling them instead “non-Arian”, was one of the few anti-Nazi movies produced and released before the American entry in WWII in 1941. Is it possible that studio moguls didn’t find swastikas, brown shirts, Roman salutes and Nazis atrocities photogenic enough to grab the American audience’s attention? There are different theories and an ongoing debate between historian on this subject. Surely in early 1930’s, when lots of people still preferred to believe that Nazism once reached the power would have been able to renounce to his more ferocious side, nobody was ready to risk to be cut out of the German market. Money does not stink, business is business, not Hitler (apparently a voracious cinéphile) nor the powerful Reich Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels (a great admirer of the American film industry) wanted to deprive German people of Hollywood films, so why do something that could annoy them? Recently someone talked about a shocking “collaboration” between Hollywood and the Nazi regime with scripts passed to the German Consul based in Los Angeles to be “adjusted”. Others, saying that the films were censored in fact in Germany where, obviously, the presence of unwelcome themes or even actors could lead to a ban on single titles, admit that Studios often tried to prevent this self-censoring their movies.

Hitler Youth members performing the Nazi salute at a rally at the Lustgarten in Berlin, 1933 (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

To be true after 1936 only MGM (the Studio that later will produce The Mortal Storm), Paramount and 20th Century Fox still distribute their films in Germany (Warner Brothers, for instance, had left the German market in 1934 after its representative, an English Jew, had been hit by Nazis, an event leading to his death a few months later). This is the reason why someone else affirms that the shortage of explicit anti-Nazi films produced before 1940 is in fact another mere consequence of the strict application of the infamous Motion Picture Production Code (the so called Hays Code) stating among other things “The history, institutions, prominent people, and citizenry of all nations shall be represented fairly.”, which means the Ultra-Nazi Germany and Hitler were included. And the silence about the discrimination and violence on Jews where, according to this theory, a consequence of the anti-Semitism affecting not only Europe but also the American society.

Obviously the invasion of Poland and the subsequent outburst of WWII changed everything and in 1940 The Mortal Storm lead to the ban of all MGM films from Germany, a measure probably welcomed at that point.

 We now know how the History ended and that makes quite difficult not to consider The Mortal Storm a film a bit naïve: real Nazis were worst than those depicted there. Anyway this movie shows quite effectively how Nazism could literally consumed human relationships, expelling from the German society those considered dissidents or “impure” and calling to a blind obedience with no possible dispensation all Nazi party members (“in the service of your Country there are no human relationships…” said the Nazi official to Fritz when he tries not to lead the mission to catch Freya and Martin ), and this is a reason sufficient to watch this film again today.

A few related movies you could also like (click on the title to watch a clip or the trailer):

The Lady Vanishes – UK 1938 Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock. Starring: Margaret Lockwood; Michael Redgrave; Dame May Whitty; Naunton Wayne; Basil Radford.

Night train to Munich – UK 1940 Directed by: Carol Reed. Starring: Margaret Lockwood; Rex Harrison; Paul von Henreid (Paul Henreid); Naunton Wayne; Basil Radford.

The Great Dictator – USA 1940 Directed by: Charlie Chaplin. Starring: Charlie Chaplin; Paulette Goddard; Jack Oakie.

Man Hunt – USA 1941 Directed by: Fritz Lang. Starring: Walter Pidgeon; Joan Bennett; George Sanders.

To be or not to be – USA 1942 Directed by: Ernst Lubitsch. Starring: Carole Lombard; Jack Benny; Felix Bressart; Robert Stack.

Casablanca – USA 1942 Directed by: Michael Curtiz. Starring: Humprey Bogart; Ingrid Bergman; Paul Henreid; Claude Rains; Peter Lorre.

This Land is Mine – USA 1943 Directed by: Jean Renoir. Starring: Charles Laughton; Maureen O’Hara; George Sanders. pellicola2

Quando servivi quella nazione non esistevano relazioni umane…

30 gennaio 1933 – In una piccola città universitaria tedesca, non lontana dal confine Austriaco, il “non ariano” Professor Victor Roth, che vive una vita agiata amato dai suoi studenti e dalla sua famiglia – la moglie, i due figliastri ariani Otto ed Erich, la figlia Freya ed il figlio più giovane Rudi – compie 60 anni. Dopo una commovente cerimonia alla facoltà di Medicina dove insegna, il professore festeggia tra famigliari e amici durante una festicciola che è anche l’occasione per annunciare il fidanzamento di Freya con Fritz. All’improvviso irrompe nella stanza tutta eccitata la cameriera con una notizia che ha appena sentito alla radio: Adolph Hitler è il nuovo Cancelliere tedesco…

Freya and Martin

Freya and Martin

In questo modo inizia Bufera Mortale, il film drammatico del 1940 diretto da Frank Borzage con Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart, Robert Young e Frank Morgan e indovinate un po’? Da quel momento in poi tutto va storto. Viene fuori che Fritz (Robert Young) non è altro che un entusiasta membro del Partito Nazista, come del resto Otto (Robert Stack) ed Erich, Freya (Margaret Sullavan) capisce di aver fatto un errore preferendolo al leale non-nazista Martin (James Stewart) e il Professor Roth (Frank Morgan) già intravede il futuro pieno di problemi che infatti non tardano ad arrivare. Martin difende un insegnante non-ariano da un’aggressione di un gruppo di nazisti, lo aiuta a fuggire ma è costretto alla fuga in Austria. Freya lascia Fritz, mentre il non-ariano Professor Roth, accusato di sabotare la nuova Germania Nazista insegnando il semplice fatto scientifico che non c’è differenza tra il sangue degli ariani e quello dei “non ariani”, viene prima licenziato e poi internato in un campo di concentramento dove muore. Freya, cerca di lasciare la Germania con sua madre e Rudi, ma sorpresa con in valigia un testo “sovversivo” del padre è fermata e costretta a fare ritorno a casa. Qui ritrova Martin tornato, a rischio della vita, per salvarla. Dopo essersi dichiarati eterno amore e dopo un’informale toccante matrimonio celebrato dalla madre di lui (Maria Ouspenskaya) i due si apprestano a fuggire verso l’Austria attraversando un passo di montagna con gli sci ai piedi. Al comando Nazista però tutti sanno quello che sta per accadere e proprio Fritz viene incaricato di fermarli…

Vi risparmio il finale, comunque dopo un tanto esauriente riassunto lo avrete sicuramente capito che questo è un film di propaganda anti-nazista, ma a parte il cast di prim’ordine per quale motivo dovreste guardarlo?

Robert Young as Fritz

Robert Young as Fritz

Bufera Mortale, uscì il 14 giugno 1940 giusto nove mesi e mezzo dopo l’invasione della Polonia da parte della Germania Nazista e fu giudicato da alcuni critici rilevante ma un po’ datato eppure questo film, tratto dall’omonimo romanzo del 1938 della scrittrice britannica Phyllis Bottome, che cita esplicitamente Hitler, la Germania nazista, i pestaggi, le intimidazioni, le discriminazioni e persino i campi di concentramento (anche se in una maniera tanto ingenua che quasi fa sorridere. Quasi, perchè comunque Roth ci muore) ma che dimentica di citare apertamente gli ebrei chiamandoli invece “non -Ariani”, fu uno dei pochi film Hollywoodiani esplicitamente anti-nazisti usciti prima dell’entrata in guerra degli Stati Uniti alla fine del 1941.

Possibile che nei grandi Studios di Hollywood nessuno ritenesse svastiche, camice brune, saluti romani e varie atrocità naziste abbastanza fotogenici da attrarre l’attenzione del pubblico Americano? Ci sono diverse teorie a riguardo e il dibattito tra gli storici è aperto. Sicuramente nei primi anni trenta quando ancora in tanti si illudevano che il Nazismo si sarebbe “normalizzato” una volta giunto al potere, nessuno voleva rischiare di vedersi chiudere in faccia le porte del mercato tedesco. I soldi non puzzano, gli affari sono affari, né Hitler (a quanto pare vorace cinefilo) né il suo potente Ministro della propaganda Goebbels (grande ammiratore dei prodotti dell’industria cinematografica americana) volevano privarsi o privare i tedeschi dei film di Hollywood, perché irritarli? C’è chi, in tempi recenti, ha parlato addirittura di collaborazione tra Hollywood e il regime Nazista con sceneggiature preventivamente passate al console Tedesco a Los Angeles per le “correzioni”, chi invece affermando che più semplicemente la censura venisse condotta direttamente in Germania dove ovviamente temi o attori sgraditi al Reich potevano portare al bando di singoli film, riconosce che per evitarlo si ricorresse a una sorta di auto-censura preventiva.

Il Ministro della Propaganda Nazista Joseph Goebbels (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

Va detto però che in realtà fin dal 1936 solo MGM (lo studio che poi produrrà Bufera Mortale), Paramount e 20th Century Fox continuarono a distribuire film in Germania (la Warner ad esempio fin dal 1934 aveva abbandonato il mercato Tedesco dopo che il suo rappresentate locale, un cittadino Britannico di origini ebraiche, era stato vittima di un pestaggio probabile concausa, di lì a qualche mese, della sua morte). Questa è la ragione per cui c’è infine chi afferma che in realtà la scarsità di pellicole esplicitamente anti-naziste prodotte prima del 1940 sia da attribuire al solito famigerato Codice Hays che tra le altre amenità imponeva la proibizione di rappresentare sotto una luce negativa altre Nazioni (e quindi anche il Nazistissimo Terzo Reich), le loro istituzioni e i loro rappresentanti (Hitler incluso), mentre i mancati riferimenti alle discriminazioni subite dai cittadini di origine ebraica siano frutto dei diffusi sentimenti antisemiti presenti non solo in Europa ma anche nella società americana.

Ovviamente lo scoppio della guerra in Europa cambiò tutto e nel 1940 Bufera Mortale portò all’espulsione della potente MGM dal mercato tedesco, un evento che probabilmente a quel punto era persino auspicato.

Noi che già sappiamo come in realtà andò a finire la Storia non possiamo sicuramente fare a meno di trovare Bufera Mortale un po’ ingenuo, i nazisti erano molto peggio di così. Questo film però descrive molto bene il modo in cui il Nazismo corrodeva i rapporti umani espellendo dal corpo vivo della società dissidenti e “impuri” e richiedendo una cieca fedeltà senza deroghe ai membri del partito-stato (“nel servizio alla patria non esistono rapporti umani” dice il funzionario di partito a Fritz quando lui cerca di evitare di guidare la cattura di Freya) e questa è la ragione per cui vale sicuramente la pena di rivederlo.

Alcuni film collegati che potrebbero piacervi (cliccate sui titoli per vedere una scena o il trailer):

La Signora Scompare – UK 1938 Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock. Starring: Margaret Lockwood; Michael Redgrave; Dame May Whitty; Naunton Wayne; Basil Radford.

Night train to Munich – UK 1940 Directed by: Carol Reed. Starring: Margaret Lockwood; Rex Harrison; Paul von Henreid (Paul Henreid); Naunton Wayne; Basil Radford.

Il Grande Dittatore – USA 1940 Directed by: Charlie Chaplin. Starring: Charlie Chaplin; Paulette Goddard; Jack Oakie.

Duello Mortale – USA 1941 Directed by: Fritz Lang. Starring: Walter Pidgeon; Joan Bennett; George Sanders.

Vogliamo Vivere! – USA 1942 Directed by: Ernst Lubitsch. Starring: Carole Lombard; Jack Benny; Felix Bressart; Robert Stack.

Casablanca – USA 1942 Directed by: Michael Curtiz. Starring: Humprey Bogart; Ingrid Bergman; Paul Henreid; Claude Rains; Peter Lorre.

Questa Terra è Mia – USA 1943 Directed by: Jean Renoir. Starring: Charles Laughton; Maureen O’Hara; George Sanders.

About Ella V

I love old movies, rock music, books, art... I'm intrested in politics. I adore cats. I knit...

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s