This Above All 1942

This Above All (Sono un Disertore) – USA 1942

Directed by: Anatole Litvak.

Starring: Joan Fontaine; Tyrone Power; Thomas Mitchell; Nigel Bruce; Gladys Cooper; Philip Merivale.

A pleasant surprise

Sometimes a film may surprise you, exactly the effect that had on me This Above All the war romance, directed by Anatole Litvak in 1942 and based on the 1941 novel written by Eric Knight, I (incredibly) only recently discovered .

This Above All (film)

This Above All (film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The film set in England at the beginning of WWII, after the battle of France and the Dunkirk evacuation (between May and June 1940), tells about love, class conflicts, courage and patriotism.

The protagonists are Joan Fontaine, who had just won an Oscar for Hitchcock’s Suspicion and wasn’t very happy to play in this movie, and Tyrone Power, the dark and handsome who was about to enlist in the Marine Corps. They play the young upper-class girl Prudence Cathaway, who joins for an almost childlike patriotism the Woman’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF) defying conventions and her family, and the young working-class guy Clive Briggs, who quite inexplicably is not wearing a uniform. They meet thanks to a blind date (probably the blindest date ever, seeing that it happens during a war black out and they can hardly see each other) a Prudence’s friend organized. They decide to meet again in the sunlight, they like each other in spite of those class differences Prudence seems to ignore and Clive is obsessed with, and finally end by going together in Dover to spend there the first Prudence’s licence. During this (very unseemly) vacation the girl discovers that Clive is in fact a soldier and a courageous one too (so one of his comrade they meet there tells her) who had been in Dunkirk. But Clive doesn’t want to talk about war at least until he reveals to Prudence how he’s disgusted by the way war is run by generals (all coming from upper-class) and by the fact that not even war is able, and never will be, to break the classism pervading the British society. Prudence puts all her heart in a passionate patriotic speech, but she seems unable to move Clive who still believes there’s no point in fighting a war that won’t change the society in its foundations. One day waking up the girl discovers that Clive has gone leaving a letter telling he’s not going to join the regiment. He’s now a deserter. Obviously a story written and turned into a movie in wartime can’t end this way, so after a while Clive comes to his senses and decides to return to his regiment but first he wants to marry Prudence… Once again very obviously, a series of unfortunate events obstruct his path. First an arrest followed by a temporary release (because of previous heroism), then a bombing, an emergency operation performed by Prudence’s father (I forgot to tell you he’s a very respected surgeon…), a marriage in (almost)extremis, the final repentance. The only thing that remains a bit obscure is Clive’s final destiny.

Tyrone Power, Motion Picture magazine, Septemb...

Tyrone Power, from Motion Picture magazine, September 1940 (Photo credit: The Bees Knees Daily)

What really surprised me was the way Clive, the deserter, is described: he’s not a shady and coward little man who only thinks to save himself, but a handsome, courageous guy and above all he’s also an idealist maybe a bit disillusioned. His unpatriotic behaviour is the product of a society in which social injustice is the rule and that idea is repeated more than once. What makes him change his mind is Prudence’s love (well, maybe…) and the fact that now the Nazis are the enemies to beat: for class struggle there will be time later.

Not very surprising was to discover that This Above All had many troubles with censorship, but unexpectedly it seems that censors were not worried about the too pleasant deserter or the continuous talking of class conflicts (these sort of things will become serious problems a decade later with the spread of the red scare), something else captured their attention: the affair between two young unmarried people. Apparently in Eric Knight’s novel everything was a great deal more explicit and the result was Prudence’s pregnancy (and here is the reason why an improvised marriage was needed …). The script had to be revised many times to meet the Production Code Administration‘s requirements, and that’s the reason why now we can see Prudence and Clive sleeping in separate rooms in Dover and we are forced to use our imagination to guess what they will do during the bombing when they are passing the night in the same room. Clearly, war couldn’t beat social iniquity (on the contrary…), and was powerless against Hollywood stupid censorship too.

But if this movie has some fault, is not the censorship to be blamed for. The film weakens a bit in its final part, it becomes a bit too predictable, too many troubles for our young heroes while too much propaganda determines Clive’s actions… but after all there was a war going on.

Anyway, This Above All is a surprisingly delightful movie you will love if you love romance.

Enjoy it (you’ll easily find it on DVD).

A few free-associated movies you could also like (click on the title to watch a clip or the trailer):

Dark Journey – UK 1937 Directed by: Victor Saville. Starring: Vivien Leigh; Conradt Veidt; Joan Gardner.

Waterloo Bridge – USA 1940 Directed by: Mervyn Leroy. Starring: Vivien Leigh; Robert Taylor; Lucille Watson.

Mrs Miniver USA 1942 Directed by: William Wyler. Starring: Greer Garson; Walter Pidgeon; Teresa Wright; Dame May Witty; Henry Travers; Richard Ney.

Casablanca – USA 1942 directed by: Michael Curtiz. Starring: Humphrey Bogart; Ingrid Bergman; Paul Henreid; Claude Rains; Conradt Veidt; Peter Lorre; Sydney Greenstreet.

Cold Mountain USA 2003 Directed by: Anthony Minghella. Starring: Jude Law; Nicole Kidman; Renée Zellweger; Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Atonement UK 2007 Directed by: Joe Wright. Starring: Keira Nightley; James McAvoy; Vanessa Redgrave; Saoirse roan; Romola Garai.

pellicola2

Una bella sorpresa.

A volte un film può sorprendervi, proprio come mi ha sorpresa piacevolmente Sono un disertore (This Above All), il romantico film di guerra diretto da Anatole Litvak nel 1942 e tratto dal romanzo omonimo di Eric Knight (l’autore di Lassie) del 1941, che ho scoperto solo di recente (possibile?).

Il film ambientato in Inghilterra all’inizio della Seconda Guerra Mondiale, dopo la battaglia di Francia e l’ evacuazione di Dunkerque (tra maggio e giugno 1940), parla d’amore, conflitti di classe, coraggio e patriottismo.

English: Gary Cooper and Joan Fontaine holding...

Gary Cooper and Joan Fontaine holding their Oscars at an Academy Awards after party in 1942. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I protagonisti del film sono Joan Fontaine, che aveva appena vinto un Oscar per Il Sospetto di Hitchcock ed accettò con una certa riluttanza l’ingaggio, e Tyrone Power, il bel tenebroso che pochi mesi dopo l’uscita del film si arruolerà nei marines. Qui interpretano la giovane e aristocratica Prudence Cathaway che per una sorta di infantile patriottismo si è arruolata nei corpi ausiliari dell’aeronautica (Woman’s Auxiliary Air Force – WAAF) sfidando e convenzioni e la sua famiglia e il giovane proletario Clive Briggs che inspiegabilmente non veste invece nessuna uniforme. I due si incontrano grazie a un appuntamento al buio (davvero al buio visto che c’è l’oscuramento) organizzato da una compagna di Prudence. Decidono di rivedersi alla luce del sole, si piacciono nonostante le differenze di classe che non sembrano pesare alla ragazza ma che disturbano assai Clive, e finiscono coll’andare a Dover per passare assieme la prima licenza di Prudence. Durante questa (assai sconveniente) vacanza Prudence scopre che Clive è un soldato e che si trovava a Dunkerque. Un commilitone del ragazzo incontrato sul posto lo dipinge come un eroe, ma lui rifiuta di parlare della guerra almeno fino a quando non rivela alla ragazza del suo disgusto per il modo cui l’esercito viene condotto da incapaci generali provenienti dalla buona società e per il fatto che nemmeno la guerra riesca a scalfire il classismo della società Britannica. Prudence si lancia in un appassionato discorso patriottico, ma Clive continua comunque a pensare che sia inutile combattere in una guerra che non cancellerà le iniquità. Quando una mattina la ragazza si sveglia scoprendo che Clive l’ha lasciata trova una lettera in cui lui le rivela che non ha nessuna intenzione di tornare al suo reparto. Ormai è un disertore. Ovviamente una storia scritta e tradotta in film in tempo di guerra non può finire così e quindi dopo un po’ Clive riacquista la “ragione” e decide di consegnarsi, ma non prima di essersi riabilitato agli occhi dell’amata e di averla sposata… ed altrettanto ovviamente una serie di eventi si metteranno di traverso per ostacolare i suoi progetti: un arresto, un rilascio sulla parola per pregresso manifesto eroismo, un bombardamento, un’operazione d’urgenza eseguita dal padre di Prudence (che non ve l’avevo detto, ma ovviamente è un eminente chirurgo…), un matrimonio in punto di (quasi)morte e il rinsavimento finale di Clive sul cui destino rimane però un incognita.

Anatole Litvak

Anatole Litvak (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

La cosa che mi ha davvero sorpreso è il modo in cui viene descritto Clive, il disertore: non un uomo viscido e pavido che pensa solo a salvarsi la pelle magari a scapito di qualcun altro, ma un bel ragazzo coraggioso e idealista, forse un po’ disilluso. Il suo comportamento poco patriottico è in realtà il prodotto di un Paese in cui regna l’ingiustizia sociale e il concetto è ripetuto più di una volta. A farlo tornare sui suoi passi sono l’amore per Prudence (beh, forse…) e la consapevolezza del fatto che il nemico da battere ora sono i nazisti (che se vincessero sicuramente produrrebbero una società persino più ingiusta): per la lotta di classe ci sarà tempo a guerra finita.

Davvero poco sorprendente è stato scoprire che Sono un disertore ebbe parecchi problemi con la censura ma inaspettatamente, a quanto pare, a preoccupare terribilmente i censori non furono né i ripetuti accenni ai conflitti sociali né il disertore fin troppo piacevole (queste sono questioni che preoccuperanno molto di più i censori nella decade successiva), ma altro: la sconveniente relazione tra due giovani non sposati! Nel romanzo di Eric Knight (che francamente a questo punto mi piacerebbe leggere ma che proprio non riesco a trovare in giro) la relazione tra Prudence a Clive era narrata in maniera più esplicita e finiva col produrre una gravidanza indesiderata (ecco perché dovevano sposarsi…). Il copione fu riscritto più volte fino a che non fu ritenuto accettabile dalla Production Code Adminitration, e questo è il motivo per cui ora noi possiamo vedere Prudence e Clive che a Dover dormono in camere rigorosamente separate mentre quello che fanno quando si ritrovano abbracciati (e quindi entrambi nella stessa stanza!) durante un bombardamento viene lasciato alla nostra immaginazione. Evidentemente la guerra non solo non era in grado di modificare gli assetti sociali, ma nemmeno di ammorbidire un po’ la bacchettona censura Hollywoodiana.

Va detto però che se il film ha qualche difetto la colpa non va data alla censura. Sono un Disertore si “sgonfia” un po’ nel finale, diventa un po’ troppo prevedibile con tutta quella sequela di sventure che minacciano il futuro dei due innamorati ma soprattutto con le massicce iniezioni di propaganda che teleguidano le azioni del buon Clive. Ma in fondo si era in tempo di guerra, sarebbe stato difficile evitarlo.

Comunque Sono un Disertore rimane un film sorprendentemente delizioso che piacerà soprattutto a chiunque possieda uno spirito romantico. Se volete vederlo lo potete tranquillamente trovare in DVD, ma se prima volete farvene un’idea (e l’inglese non è un problema) potete farvi un giro su YouTube.

Buona visione.

Alcuni film liberamente associati che potrebbero piacervi (cliccate sui titoli per vedere una scena o il trailer):

Le Tre Spie – UK 1937 Directed by: Victor Saville. Starring: Vivien Leigh; Conradt Veidt; Joan Gardner.

Il Ponte di Waterloo – USA 1940 Directed by: Mervyn Leroy. Starring: Vivien Leigh; Robert Taylor; Lucille Watson.

La Signora Miniver USA 1942 Directed by: William Wyler. Starring: Greer Garson; Walter Pidgeon; Teresa Wright; Dame May Witty; Henry Travers; Richard Ney.

Casablanca – USA 1942 directed by: Michael Curtiz. Starring: Humphrey Bogart; Ingrid Bergman; Claude Rains; Paul Henreid; Peter Lorre; Sydney Greenstreet.

Ritorno a Cold Mountain USA 2003 Directed by: Anthony Minghella. Starring: Jude Law; Nicole Kidman; Renée Zellweger; Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Espiazione – UK 2007 Directed by: Joe Wright. Starring: Keira Nightley; James McAvoy; Vanessa Redgrave; Saoirse roan; Romola Garai.

Enhanced by Zemanta

About Ella V

I love old movies, rock music, books, art... I'm intrested in politics. I adore cats. I knit...

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s