A star is born37

A Star is Born (È nata una stella) – USA 1937

Directed by: William A. Wellman.

Starring: Janet Gaynor; Fredric March; Adolphe Menjou; Lionel Stander.

For every star that rises another one must fall.

If you’re complaining that too many remakes are in theatres these days, just remember that remakes ain’t nothing new in Hollywood. After all, every story that once made a lot of money always deserve a second chance. Take “A Star is Born”, for instance. This film directed in 1937 by William A. Wellman and starring Janet Gaynor and Fredric March had two more versions, one in 1954 starring Judy Garland and James Mason and another in 1976 starring Barbra Streisand, while just a few months ago the project for a third remake has been put aside after Beyoncé declined the offer of the leading role.

A Star is Born – 1937 (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

The story told in “A Star is Born” is very well known. A farm Girl, Ester Blodgett (Janet Gaynor), goes to Hollywood to become an actress encouraged and financed by her grandmother. At the beginning life ain’t easy, too many people share her dreams., but one day, while working as a waitress at a private party, Ester meets Norman Maine (Fredric March), a very famous actor whose career is declining for too many drinks, and guess what happens? But of course, though Ester  ain’t nothing more than an average girl, Norman immediately falls in love with her and decides to help her to fulfil her dreams and also marries  her. Obviously Ester, after changing her name in Vicky Lester, becomes a star in a fortnight and win an Oscar (yes, a real Oscar with the ceremony etc… obviously interrupted by the arrival of the drunkard spouse; otherwise, where is the drama?) while poor Norman, always drunk, goes to rehab (those days it was called sanitarium) and in the end decide to kill himself. Ester/Vicky is about to leave Hollywood but in the end is always her grandma that convince her that she shouldn’t give up her ambitions.

A realistic account of Hollywood’s life, isn’t it?

It’s hard to believe that a plain girl could succeed in stealing the heart of  a star and become a star herself in a wink of an eye, even though Ester/Vicky is played by Janet Gaynor, the very first woman who won an Oscar as Best actress in 1928 for three films (there were different rules) “Seventh Heaven”, “Street Angel” and the delightful Murnau‘s “Sunrise: a song of two humans” (so delightful that at some point you could even believe that an attempted uxoricide could be the best way to rekindle a passionless marriage, but that’s another story…), who also performs in this film her impressions of Garbo, Katherine Hepburn and Mae West (I must confess that watching the movie I guessed the first and the last but not Hepburn). But David O. Selznick, the producer who made only a few “precious” films a year and who didn’t economized on this one photographed in Technicolor, wanted to mix a sort of  classical Cinderella story to the also classical story of  a fallen idol, something that, to be true, was nothing new to him.

Cropped screenshot of Janet Gaynor from the fi...

Janet Gaynor in A Star is Born. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In fact only 5 year earlier, in 1932, Selznick produced for RKO the film directed by George Cukor  “What price Hollywood?” the story of a girl, Mary Evans (Constance Bennett), who works as a waitress in a club where cinema people mingle, knows Max Carey (Lowell Sherman) a famous director and an hopeless drunkard who doesn’t marry her but makes her a star, marry a polo player, wins an Oscar, is mixed in the poor director’s suicide becoming the centre of gossip and finally retires to live as an unknown wife in France. It’s because of the similarity to this story that George Cukor, the “women’s director”, refuse the offer to direct “A Star is Born” (but then he directed the 1954 remake), while RKO legal department recommended to sue Selznick for plagiarism (but it seems nothing really happened) and curiously this not very “original” film won an Oscar (the only one among seven nominations) for Best Story (that became in 1957 Best Writing – Original Screenplay) thanks to the screenplay written by the director William A, Wellman and by Robert Carson, Dorothy Parker and Alan Campbell (but it seems that also Selznick, as usual, gave his unwanted contribution).

Surely “A Star is Born”  success was due not only to the Oscar veterans Fredric March (he won one in 1932 for the beautiful Mamoulian’s “Dr Jeckyll and Mr Hyde” and will win another in 1947 for “The best years of our lives”)  and Janet Gaynor, both nominated but not winning in 1938, but also to a likely scenery (we can also see, for instance, the Grauman’s Chinese Theatre with its footprints and autographs in the concrete) in which audiences could watch all their fantasies come true mixed with stories that reminded to Hollywood gossip column stories (it seems, for instance, that the crowd of fans surrounding Ester at Norman’s funeral  reminded to a similar fact happened at Irving Thalberg’s funeral to poor  Norma Shearer).

In the end a good news for all those who have never seen this movie: you can easily find it online cause it entered the public domain in 1965 when ain’t been renewed the copyright registration.

A few related movies you could also like (Click the titles to watch the trailer or a clip):

What price Hollywood? – USA 1932 Directed by: George Cukor. Starring: Constance Bennett; Lowell Sherman.

The bad and the beautiful – USA 1952 Directed by: Vincente Minnelli. Starring: Lana Turner; Kirk Douglas.

The star – USA 1952 Directed by: Stuart Heisler. Starring: Bette Davis; Sterling Haiden; Natalie Wood.

Singin’ in the rain – USA 1952 Directed by: Stanley Donen; Gene Kelly. Starring: Gene Kelly; Donald O’Connor; Debbie Reynolds; Jean Hagen.

In & out – USA 1997 Directed by: Frank OZ. Starring: Kevin Kline; Tom Selleck; Joan Cusak; Matt Dillon.

The aviator – USA 2004 Directed by: Martin Scorzese. Starring: Leonardo Di Caprio; Cate Blanchett.

The Black Dahlia – USA 2006 Directed by: Brian De Palma. Starring: Josh Harnett; Scarlett Johanson; Aaron Eckhart; Hillary Swank.

pellicola

Per ogni stella che sorge un’altra deve cadere.

Se vi state lamentando del fatto che di questi tempi nelle sale cinematografiche ci siano troppi remake, ricordate che questo non è affatto un fenomeno nuovo a Hollywood. Dopo tutto, ogni storia che ha fatto guadagnare tanti soldi una volta, merita una seconda chance. Prendete ad esempio “È nata una stella”. Il film diretto nel 1937 da William A. Wellman con Janet Gaynor e Fredric March  ha avuto altre due versioni, quella del 1954 con Judy Garland e James Mason e quella del 1976 con Barbra Streisand, mentre il progetto di un terzo remake pare essersi arenato nei mesi scorsi dopo che Beyoncé ha declinato l’offerta di interpretare il ruolo della protagonista.

Cropped screenshot of Fredric March from the f...

Fredric March in A Star is Born. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

La storia raccontata in “È nata una stella” è nota. Una ragazza di provincia, Ester Blodgett (Janet Gaynor), incoraggiata e finanziata dalla nonna va a Hollywood per diventare un’attrice. Laggiù la vita è complicata, troppe persone rincorrono gli stessi sogni, ma un giorno, mentre fa la cameriera ad una festa privata, Ester incontra Norman Maine (Fredric March), un attore famoso che sta sacrificando la carriera a qualche bicchierino di troppo, e indovinate cosa succede? Ma naturalmente, anche se Ester è una ragazza comunissima, Norman se ne innamora immediatamente, la aiuta a realizzare i suoi sogni e se la sposa pure. Ovviamente Ester, non prima di aver cambiato il suo nome in Vicky Lester, diventa una star in un batter di ciglia e vince un Oscar (si, un vero Oscar con tanto di cerimonia che, nemmeno a dirlo, viene interrotta dal consorte ubriaco fradicio, che sennò dov’è il dramma?) mentre il povero Norman sempre più ubriaco finisce in riabilitazione (allora a Hollywood però quei luoghi erano meno chic e venivano chiamati sanatorium) e alla fine decide di togliersi di mezzo suicidandosi. Ester/Vicky sta per lasciare Hollywood quando la sua nonnina arriva e la convince a non rinunciare alle sue ambizioni.

Un racconto realistico su Hollywood, che ne dite?

Janet Gaynor and George O Brien in “Sunrise: a song of two humans” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

È difficile riuscire a credere che una ragazza piuttosto scialba riesca in quattro e quattr’otto a rubare il cuore a un divo del cinema e a diventare lei stessa una stella, anche se ad interpretare Ester/Vicky è Janet Gaynor, la prima donna che abbia mai vinto l’Oscar come migliore attrice protagonista nel 1928 per  tre film (il regolamento era diverso) “Settimo cielo”, “L’angelo della strada” e il delizioso film di Murnau Aurora” (tanto delizioso che a un certo punto ti pare che un bel tentato uxoricidio sia il modo migliore per riaccendere la passione in un matrimonio un po’ fiacco, ma questa è un’altra storia…) e che ci offre qui anche la sua personale imitazione di tre dive come la Garbo, Katherine Hepburn e Mae West (confesso che guardando il film avevo riconosciuto la prima e l’ultima ma non la Hepburn). Ma  David O. Selznick, il produttore che voleva che i suoi film fossero tutti dei “gioiellini” e che non badando a spese realizzò “È nata una stella” in Technicolor, voleva riunire in un solo film la classica storia alla Cenerentola con quella altrettanto classica dell’idolo infranto, qualcosa che a dire il vero non era proprio una novità per lui.

“What price Hollywood?” poster (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Infatti solo 5 anni prima, nel 1932, Selznick aveva prodotto per la RKO il film diretto da George Cukor “A che prezzo Hollywood” la storia di una ragazza, Mary Evans (Constance Bennett), che lavora come cameriera in un locale dove si può incontrare la gente del cinema, finisce col conoscere  Max Carey (Lowell Sherman), un regista famoso ma anche un ubriacone senza speranze che non la sposa ma la fa diventare una star, si sposa con un giocatore di Polo, vince un Oscar, rimane invischiata nel suicidio del povero regista finendo al centro dei pettegolezzi e infine si ritira a vivere come un’anonima moglie e madre in Francia. Proprio per la similitudine con quel film Cukor, “il regista delle donne”, rifiutò l’offerta di Selznick di dirigere “È nata una stella” (anche se poi ne diresse il remake del 1954), mentre la RKO minacciò una querela per plagio che però non ebbe seguito e curiosamente questo film non proprio “originale” vinse  un Oscar (il solo vinto dal film tra i sette ai quali era candidato) per la “Migliore Storia” (premio che diventò dal 1957 quello per la migliore sceneggiatura originale) grazie alla sceneggiatura scritta dallo stesso regista William A.Wellman, Robert Carson, Dorothy Parker e Alan Campbell (ma pare che come sua abitudine anche Selznick dette il suo contributo non richiesto).

Sicuramente parte del successo di “È nata una stella” si  deve oltre che ai veterani dell’Oscar Fredric March (ne aveva vinto uno nel 1932 per il bellissimo “Dr Jeckyll and Mr Hyde” di Mamoulian e ne vincerà un altro nel 1947 per “I migliori anni della nostra vita”) e Janet Gaynor, entrambi candidati per questo film ma rimasti a bocca asciutta nell’edizione del 1938, anche al fatto che in uno scenario verosimile (si vedono ad esmpio anche il Grauman’s Chinese Theatre e le impronte nel cemento di alcuni divi), si dia libero sfogo alle fantasie di gloria di tanti spettatori mischiandole a storie che riecheggiano vicende note alle cronache pettegole di Hollywood (pare ad esempio, che la scena del funerale di Norman Maine con i fan che opprimono Ester sia stata ispirata dai veri funerali di Irving Thalberg con i fan che assediavano la povera Norma Shearer).

Per finire una buona notizia per chi non avesse mai visto il film: non è affatto un’impresa trovarne copie in rete visto che non essendo stato rinnovato il copyright nel 1965 è diventato di pubblico dominio.

 Alcuni film collegati che potrebbero piacervi (Cliccate sui titoli per vedere il trailer o una scena dei film):

A che prezzo Hollywood? – USA 1932 Directed by: George Cukor. Starring: Constance Bennett; Lowell Sherman.

Il bruto e la bella – USA 1952 Directed by: Vincente Minnelli. Starring: Lana Turner; Kirk Douglas.

La diva – USA 1952 Directed by: Stuart Heisler. Starring: Bette Davis; Sterling Haiden; Natalie Wood.

Cantando sotto la pioggia – USA 1952 Directed by: Stanley Donen; Gene Kelly. Starring: Gene Kelly; Donald O’Connor; Debbie Reynolds; Jean Hagen.

In & out – USA 1997 Directed by: Frank OZ. Starring: Kevin Kline; Tom Selleck; Joan Cusak; Matt Dillon.

The aviator – USA 2004 Directed by: Martin Scorzese. Starring: Leonardo Di Caprio; Cate Blanchett.

Black Dahlia – USA 2006 Directed by: Brian De Palma. Starring: Josh Harnett; Scarlett Johanson; Aaron Eckhart; Hillary Swank.

About Ella V

I love old movies, rock music, books, art... I'm intrested in politics. I adore cats. I knit...

5 responses »

  1. blankenmom says:

    Hey – I’ve actually seen this one! Love the old movies and this one was pretty good! I’ll have to watch the other versions now. 🙂

  2. TINe says:

    Ciao Ella,
    ti ho asseganto un premio e spero verrai a ritirarlo sul mio blog. A presto

  3. rebeccaww7 says:

    This is a great version but I still think the 1954 Judy Garland version is the best!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s