wonderfullife1946

It’s a Wonderful Life (La vita è meravigliosa) – USA 1946

Directed by: Frank Capra.

Starring: James Stewart; Donna Reed; Thomas Mitchell; Henry Travers; Lionel Barrymore.

It’s Christmas time, time for communist propaganda!

New York – December 20, 1946. At the Globe Theatre opens It’s a wonderful life, directed by Frank Capra.

You probably already know the story the film tells:

It's a Wonderful Life

It’s a Wonderful Life (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s Christmas Eve 1945, while in a small town called Bedford Falls, George Bailey (James Stewart) is about to kill himself, in Heaven a Second class Angel (without wings) called Clarence (Henry Travers) is assigned to him as guardian angel (if he saves him a pair of wing will be granted to him). All George’s life is shown to him (and to us) in a long flashback. The poor fellow has always been an exceptional guy. As a child saved his younger brother from sure death (loosing the hearing in the left ear) and the drugist Mr Grover, his boss, from sure imprisonment (despite his father was the founder of a local Building and Loan Association he was a part-time child worker at 12). After his father death, as a young man, he saved his father’s company from the grasping hands of Mr Henry F. Potter (Lionel Barrymore), local banker and slumlord; married Mary (Donna Reed) the small town girl who was in love with him since her childhood; built houses for poor workers; couldn’t enlist because of his damaged ear… and now that he’s 38 and has a bunch of children he’s about to go to prison accused of bank fraud by the greedy Mr Potter because his absent-minded uncle Billy (Thomas Mitchell) lost a large sum, the Buildings and Loan’s cash fund, he had to depot. The guy has always been forced to put aside his dreams (travel around the world, go to University and become an architect…) to help someone else and this last accident destroys his faith in life. The only thing Clarence can do so that George could finally appreciate his life is to show him how world could have been without him…

Receiving French Croix de Guerre with Palm in 1944 (Phot Credit: Wikipedia)

More than a year after the end of WWII It’s a Wonderful Life is the come-back film for both the Italian-born director (Arsenic and Old Lace was released in 1944, but filmed in 1941) and the protagonist, Jimmi Stewart. Capra had quit his Hollywood career soon after the attack on Pearl Harbor (December 7, 1941) to enlist as a Major into the US Army and, working directly under Chief of  Staff George C. Marshall (the General who will create the Marshal Plan), he directed a series of documentaries called “Why we fight” whose aims was to show to the American soldiers  why they were fighting for a just cause. Stewart had taken a four-years pause to serve as aviator in the Army (he took part in raids over Germany receiving a couple of medals and raised from private to colonel in four years).

Despite all that, It’s a Wonderful Life ain’t a hit, neither critics nor audiences are enthusiast and the film, though winning five Academy Award nominations (Best Picture; Director; Leading Actor; Editing; Sound Recording and  Technical Achievement) but only one Oscar (Technical Achievement for a new kind of artificial snow invented for this movie), is a box-office faillure. It will took almost three decades, a controversial copyright lapse in 1974 and TV to make it the classic Christmas film it is today.

A distraught George Bailey (James Stewart) ple...

A distraught George Bailey (James Stewart) pleads for help from Mr. Potter. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Funnily enough, it seems that the movie  is able to grab the immediate attention of FBI and a file is opened less than 6 months after its release. Apparently It’s a Wonderful Life, the sugary  Christmas story based on the 1939 short story The Greatest Gift by Philip Van Doren Stern, is the typical example of  Communist propaganda. The general idea is that to depict Mr Potter, the banker, as such a greedy man, is just an expedient to denigrate bankers and capitalism itself (and who knows if someone also notices that in a very important scene when Mr Potter summons George to his office and tries to seduce him by the dark side of the force, he acts like Hynkel/Hitler – Hitler! –  in Chaplin’s Great Dictator obliging the guy to seat in a very small chair…). Can you imagine? Two war heroes and an Angel involved into a devious plot to turn the United States into a communist Country! Though  I can’t be sure if this story, the FBI file, is true (no time to check it properly, sorry), you can find the supposed documents clicking this link: http://www.paperlessarchives.com/compic.html

but that makes poor George Bailey, the man who always put his dreams aside, Clarence, the naive angel, and all the sugar filling this pitcure decidedly more intriguing.

Anyway It’s a Wonderful Life is worth watching, you won’t find communist propaganda but a few very romantic scenes (the first kiss with Mary, the honeymoon…) and an overdose of sentiment. But beware!! It can be a little depressing if you watch it alone on Christamas Eve, especially if you’ve never saved somebody’s life, a girl from spinsterhood, a small town from vice…

Merry Christmas!

Sugar enough for a lifetime! Here are a few of my favourite and Christmas-unrelated movies that you can watch during next winter holidays (click on the title to watch a clip or the trailer):

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde – USA 1931 Directed by: Rouben Mamoulian. Starring: Fredric March; Miriam Hopkins; Rose Hobart.

Trouble in Paradise – USA 1932 Directed by: Ernst Lubitsch. Starring: Herbert Marshal; Miriam Hopkins; Kay Francis.

Scarface – USA 1932 Directed by: Howard Hawks. Starring: Paul Muni; George Raft; Ann Dvorak; Ann Morley.

Gone with the Wind – USA 1939 Directed by: Victor Fleming. Starring: Vivien Leigh; Clark Gable; Olivia de Havilland; Leslie Howard.

The Letter – USA 1940 Directed by: William Wyler. Starring: Bette Davis; Herbert Marshal; James Stephenson.

Notorious – USA 1946 Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock. Starring: Cary Grant; Ingrid Bergman; Claude Rains; Madame Konstantin.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes – USA 1953 Directed by: Howard Hawks. Starring: Marilyn Monroe; Jane Russell; Charles Coburn.

Sabrina – USA 1954 Direted by: Billy Wilder. Starring: Audrey Hepburn; Humphrey Bogart; William Holden

pellicola

É Natale, il periodo ideale per la propaganda comunista!!!

New York – 20 Dicembre 1946. Al Globe Theatre si tiene la prima di La vita è meravigliosa, film diretto da Frank Capra.

Probabilmente la storia raccontata in quel film la conoscerete già:

Travers in his most memorable role, as Clarenc...

Clarence cerca di guadagnarsi le ali (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

È la notte di Natale del 1945, mentre a Bedford Falls, una cittadina della provincia americana, George Bailey (James Stewart) sta meditando di suicidarsi, in Paradiso l’Angelo di Seconda Classe (cioè senza ali) Clarence (Henry Travers) viene incaricato di salvarlo  (si guadagnerà le ali se la sua missione avrà successo). Tutta la vita di George viene mostrata a Clarence (e a noi) in un lungo flashback. Il poverino è un tipo davvero eccezionale. Da bambino ha salvato suo fratello da morte certa (perdendo l’udito dall’orecchio sinistro) e il farmacista Mr Grover, il suo capo, da sicura condanna per omicidio (a dodici anni, nonostante il padre sia il fondatore della locale Compagnia di Costruzioni e Mutui, è già un bambino lavoratore part-time). Dopo la morte di suo padre, ormai giovane uomo, salva la compagnia dalle avide grinfie di Henry F. Potter (Lionel Barrymore), banchiere locale e proprietario delle baracche in cui vivono i lavoratori. Poi sposa Mary (Donna Reed), la ragazza che è sempre stata  innamorata di lui; costruisce case dignitose per i lavoratori; non riesce ad arruolarsi per colpa dell’orecchio… e ora che ha 38 anni e un sacco di bambini sta per finire in galera accusato di appropriazione indebita da Potter, perchè il suo sbadatissimo zio Billy (Thomas Mitchell) si è perso gli 8000 dollari che avrebbe dovuto depositare in banca a nome della Compagnia di Costruzioni e Mutui. George per tutta la vita ha dovuto rinunciare ai suoi sogni (viaggiare per il mondo, andare all’università, diventare architetto…) per fare il bene di qualcun altro e ora ha perso ogni voglia di vivere. Clarence può fare solo una cosa per provargli che la sua vita non è inutile: mostrargli come sarebbe stato il mondo se lui non fosse mai nato…

English: Photo of Frank Capra receiving the Di...

Frank Capra receiving the Distinguished Service Medal from U.S. Army Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A più di un anno dalla fine della Seconda Guerra Mondiale, La vita è meravigliosa segna il ritorno ad Hollywood sia per il regista nato in Italia e naturallizato americano (Arsenico e vecchi merletti era uscito nel 1944, ma era stato girato nel 1941), sia per il protagonista della pellicola, Jimmi Stewart. Capra aveva lasciato Hollywood subito dopo l’attacco Giapponese a Pearl Harbor (7 Dicembre 1941) per arruolarsi col grado di Maggiore nell’Esercito Statunitense e lavorando direttamente agli ordini del Capo di Stato Maggiore il Generale George C. Marshall (quello del famoso piano Marshall) aveva diretto una serie di documentari intitolati Why We Fight (Perchè combattiamo), che avevano come scopo quello di spiegare alle truppe le giustezza delle ragioni per cui stavano combattendo. Stewart invece aveva messo in pausa la sua carriera per quattro anni ed aveva partecipato da aviatore alla Seconda Guerra Mondiale pilotando il suo areo in diverse missioni sulle città tedesche, guadagnandosi un paio di medaglie e scalando i ranghi da soldato semplice a colonnello.

Ma nonostante queste premesse, il film non è un immediato successo, non convince completamente né la critica né il pubblico e, nonostante cinque nomination agli Oscar (Miglior Film; Regista; Atore protagonista; Montaggio; Effetti sonori e premio speciale per la tecnica) e un solo premio vinto (quello tecnico per l’invenzione di un nuovo tipo di neve artificiale), è un fallimento al botteghino. Ci vorranno quasi tre decadi, la controversa scadenza del copyright nel 1974 e la TV per fare di questo film il classico di Natale che è oggi.

Mr. Potter slumps in his wheelchair when havin...

Mr. Potter (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Curiosamente però, il film sembra attirare l’attenzione dell’FBI che, a meno di 6 mesi dalla sua uscita nelle sale, apre un fascicolo in proposito. A quanto pare La vita è meravigliosa, la zuccherosa storia di Natale tratta dal racconto del 1939 The Greatest Gift (il regalo più grande) by Philip Van Doren Stern è in realtà il tipico esempio di propaganda comunista. L’idea è che dipingendo Mr Potter come un uomo avido e privo di sentimenti si stia cercando di denigrare non solo i banchieri, ma il capitalismo nel suo insieme (e chissà se qualcuno nota anche che in una delle scene più importanti, quando Potter convoca George nel suo ufficio e cerca di sedurlo col lato oscuro della forza, il banchiere agisce esattamente come Hynkel/Hitler – Hitler! – in Il Grande Dittatore di Charlie Chaplin, costringendo il giovane a sedersi su una sedia molto bassa…). Riuscite a immaginarvelo? Due eroi di guerra ed un angelo coinvolti in un subdolo piano per trasformare gli Stati Uniti in un Paese comunista! Anche se non posso essere sicura al cento per cento sulla veridicità di questa storia (non ho fatto abbastanza ricerche, spiacente), in rete si possono trovare almeno una parte dei supposti file dell’FBI, basta cliccare il seguente link: http://www.paperlessarchives.com/compic.html

sicuramente questa storia rende il povero George Bailey, l’uomo che deve sempre rinunciare ai suoi sogni, Clarence, l’angelo ingenuo, e tutta questo storia zuccherosa molto più interessanti.

In ogni caso, vale la pena di rivedere La vita è meravigliosa. Non ci troverete propaganda comunista, ma molto romanticismo (la scena del primo bacio e quella della luna di miele sono fantastiche) e un overdose di buoni sentimenti. Un solo consiglio: vedrlo da soli proprio la sera di Natale potrebbe risultare un tantino deprimente, specialmente se non avete mai salvato vite, giovani donne dallo zitellaggio, o un’intera cittadina dal vizio…

Buon Natale!

Dopo aver cercato di propinarvi una dose di melassa sufficiente a stroncare un cavallo, ecco invece alcuni dei miei film preferiti, che con il Natale non centrano niente, ma che potete guardarvi nel corso delle prossime vacanze (un click sul titolo per vedere il trailer o una scena):

Il Dottor Jekyll – USA 1931 Directed by: Rouben Mamoulian. Starring: Fredric March; Miriam Hopkins; Rose Hobart.

Mancia Competente – USA 1932 Directed by: Ernst Lubitsch. Starring: Herbert Marshal; Miriam Hopkins; Kay Francis.

Scarface – Lo sfregiato – USA 1932 Directed by: Howard Hawks. Starring: Paul Muni; George Raft; Ann Dvorak; Ann Morley.

Via col Vento – USA 1939 Directed by: Victor Fleming. Starring: Vivien Leigh; Clark Gable; Olivia de Havilland; Leslie Howard.

Ombre Malesi – USA 1940 Directed by: William Wyler. Starring: Bette Davis; Herbert Marshal; James Stephenson.

Notorious, l’amante perduta – USA 1946 Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock. Starring: Cary Grant; Ingrid Bergman; Claude Rains; Madame Konstantin.

Gli uomini peferiscono le bionde – USA 1953 Directed by: Howard Hawks. Starring: Marilyn Monroe; Jane Russell; Charles Coburn.

Sabrina – USA 1954 Direted by: Billy Wilder. Starring: Audrey Hepburn; Humphrey Bogart; William Holden.

About Ella V

I love old movies, rock music, books, art... I'm intrested in politics. I adore cats. I knit...

5 responses »

  1. Reblogged this on Vector Charley and commented:
    It’s a Wonderful Life, the world over!

  2. aworldoffilm says:

    Nice post and blog.

    If there is any chance you like films from around the world from any period please check out my blog. http://aworldoffilm.com/

  3. TINe says:

    Forse il film di Natale per eccellenza…ed io non ricordo di averlo mai visto! Però ci sono le vacanze, e sono ottimista ;)
    Tanti auguri

    • Ella V says:

      Non disperare, scommetto che almeno su qualche TV locale lo trasmettono e comunque se non hai problemi con l’inglese, se clicchi il titolo del film in rosso in cima all’articolo potrai vederlo direttamente su YouTube…
      Buon Natale!

  4. Gully Jimson says:

    May I suggest the free podcast at
    http://outofthepast.libsyn.com/episode_13_it_s_a_wonderful_life
    where film critics discuss the film’s noir elements?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s